Reptilia

“Her tongue hasn’t always been this way. She’s pretty sure it was round and pink and human-like when she was born. It’s taken a steady diet of coffee and swear words to get her to this point, but now it’s unavoidable.” Ruth Crossman returns to The Fabulist with this chilling little fragment about the changes wrought by our bitterness.

Strange transits through “The Daylight Gate” (review)

Unfailingly dire, unflinchingly bloody, full of love and license, and brimming over with real devotion and all-too-human devilry, Jeanette Winterson’s “The Daylight Gate“ is at once a history lesson, historical fiction, and a romantic tale of the fantastic. Centered on England’s first recorded with trials in the grim aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, this post-Elizabethan milieu is peopled with historical figures Winterson has made entirely her own.

The Shoes

Don’t be fooled by its breezy, almost blase tone. Ruth Crossman’s subversive inversion of the Cinderella fairy tale, “The Shoes,” is a small-scale tragedy of disturbing power and contemporary relevance.