A marriage of cats

Extravagance, vanity, disruption and the dreary fascinations of would-be celebrity weddings are revealed as essentially absurd in poet Tim Xonnelly’s abstruse contribution to The Fabulist.

Lead Into Gold

Liana Kapelke-Dale, explores sweetly feverish inversions of fairy tale endings, and is always seeking liberation, in her poem “Lead Into Gold.”

Portland Head Light, May 1973

“They say / seven men and heavy ropes were needed / to bring me up. The gulls, they say, / cloud-hovered around the squalling, / unfurred thing, but never pecked. / They say they couldn’t find a priest or / even minister to baptize me.” Poet Devon Miller-Duggan makes her Fabulist debut with this haunting, vivid prose poem of sea changes rich and strange.

Carnations, Pigeons

“Carnations, Pigeons,” by Bainbridge Island poet Amanda Williamsen, finds a hapless heroine drifting skyward each night, her heaviness draining from her head like sand. Mornings, she wakes startled, fallen, back in bed. She wonders if her problem might be gas.

Enigma

Boise, Idaho, author and reference librarian Grove Koger brings us this heady, moody, mythic bit of verse, to inspire your own musings.

The Scaffold-Girded Hypercube (Evelyn and Her Magic Violin)

“The Spanish Surrealists are constructing a tesseract in my wife’s dream”: So begins Oscar Pelta’s slightly shocking, brightly beautiful surrealist poem, in which life and love are lost and reborn in an explosion of wings.