Fiction

Illustration by Adam Myers

Don’t Lose This

May 16, 2014

Two children receive a gift of memory and magic in “Don’t Lose This,” a short fable by San Francisco author Noah Sanders that explores redemption’s strange and demanding burdens. Illustration by Fabulist house artist Adam Myers.

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Hansel & Me

September 6, 2013

Jenny Bitner’s fanciful, feverish “Hansel & Me” finds two step-siblings wandering through a forest known to be the home of a cannibalistic witch. Hungry, cold, abandoned by their sybarite parents, the pair fantasize about food, sex and serial killers — until all their fantasies come to life within a fabulous house made of candy.

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Under the Porch

May 30, 2013

By turns eerie and poignant, “Under the Porch” is an oddly sentimental fable of eight young lives marked by the briefest encounter with strangeness and terror. Yet when seen over the span of decades, the supernatural horror at the heart of Julia Patt’s fine telling ends up being almost beside the point. — Editor.

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Ministry of Presence

March 29, 2013

Leah Erickson’s “Ministry of Presence” is a haunting tale of memory and need, set on an anonymous tropical island and playing out amidst devouring change. Rebellion and fire sweep across the land, the ash settling “in soft drifts and mounds almost up to the windowsills of the old folk’s home.”

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He Knew

May 27, 2012

by Nora Boydston (Inspired by a strange little fragment from Grimm, Nora Boydston’s “He Knew” plumbs the deep forest of European fairy tales to reveal an unsettling parable of love, loss, and what the modern reader may identify as abuse. Regarding his striking image of the rose-bearing changeling, Fabulist house artist Adam Myers notes: “I’ve […]

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Spoons

March 31, 2012

By Michael Plemmons “Spoons” is an odd and poignant little yarn about an affectionate old dog that’s been in the family since the Civil War. Writing in a naturalistic, conversational style, author Michael Plemmons follows this preposterous canine on a cross-country voyage that tests limits of love and memory. Fabulist house artist Adam Myers describes his four images for […]

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