On the Beginnings of a Universe

The all-powerful child is a memorable and chilling figure in weird fiction — from the original Star Trek’s “Charlie X” to the Twilight Zone-adaptation of Jerome Bixby’s “It’s a Good Life.” Oakland writer Laur A. Freymiller updates the trope for the #MeToo era in this striking narrative of abuse, confrontation, and literal erasure.

Supermodel of the Roman Empire

Maria McLeod’s absurdly weird little fable turns an arched eyebrow at media spectacle in the latter-day Rome that is America.

Three Tales for the Headless Child

Matthew F. Amati freely references Grimm, but then puts those timeworn tales through the postmodern/post-context wringer. The results are absurd, disturbed, gleefully unhinged, and inclined to wordplay.

Obituary

Jen Burke Anderson returns to The Fabulist with this biting little satire of our app-driven virtual society, and the blithe replacement of authentic human connections with market-driven user experiences.

The Feast

On the heels of the American Thanksgiving holiday, Britain’s L.P. Lee delivers a timely — and richly told — fable of power and abuse, and asks uncomfortable questions about abundance, scarcity, appetite and satisfaction. Her work is exquisitely illustrated by UK artist Annie Ridd.

Household Gods

Detail, "Soothsayer," by Adam Myers

Happy Halloween from The Fabulist, with our first horror story, “Household Gods,” a lurid shocker by Oxford divinities scholar Tara Isabella Burton. It is a dire telling, and the protagonist’s travails are vividly described, caveat lector. Illustration by Adam Myers.