Lead Into Gold

Liana Kapelke-Dale, explores sweetly feverish inversions of fairy tale endings, and is always seeking liberation, in her poem “Lead Into Gold.”

Portland Head Light, May 1973

“They say / seven men and heavy ropes were needed / to bring me up. The gulls, they say, / cloud-hovered around the squalling, / unfurred thing, but never pecked. / They say they couldn’t find a priest or / even minister to baptize me.” Poet Devon Miller-Duggan makes her Fabulist debut with this haunting, vivid prose poem of sea changes rich and strange.

Strange Hybrids: The Art of Robert W. Walker

The art of Ohio-based painter Robert Walker leaps from genre tropes to the nakedly reactive core of your id, creating images that are visceral, beautiful, full of intrigue — and real danger. From his “environmental surrealism” to a gorgeously disturbing Wonderland, you are advised to proceed with caution.

There are cities buried under this one

Gaurav Monga’s marvelous and strange fragments have the feel of being found as a sheaf of unbound, unnumbered pages in a yellowing envelope, laying perhaps on an otherwise empty shelf at the back on an abandoned safe-deposit vault. They tell of a lost city of self, ancient excavations, and half-glimpsed memory.

Obituary

Jen Burke Anderson returns to The Fabulist with this biting little satire of our app-driven virtual society, and the blithe replacement of authentic human connections with market-driven user experiences.

Carnations, Pigeons

“Carnations, Pigeons,” by Bainbridge Island poet Amanda Williamsen, finds a hapless heroine drifting skyward each night, her heaviness draining from her head like sand. Mornings, she wakes startled, fallen, back in bed. She wonders if her problem might be gas.