David Tennant reads vampire stories, Michael Moorcock’s rock ‘n’ roll chaos, the 6,000-year-old fairy tale, the bloodthirsty Beast of Gevaudan, and more

(Above: Edvard Munch, “Vampyr”)

David Tennant reads vampire stories: Hallowe’en has come for you a little early with this special treat — great vampire fiction by Fritz Leiber, Richard Matheson, Edith Wharton and other great authors, as read by one of the great contemporary interpreters of fantasy and science fiction roles on screens large and small.

You’ve gotta get an earful of this BBC adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward,” done in the style of a “mythbusters” podcast.

The coats of Edward Gorey (The Paris Review)

Stephen King’s “It” was whitewashed for the big screen when a central black character from the novel is retconned into insignificance. (Black Youth Project)

Fly through 17th-century London in this prizewinning animation. (Open Culture)

Some fairy tales may be as much as 6,000 year old. (Science Magazine)

Beauty and the Beast (Warwick Goble, 1913)

Michael Moorcock & The Deep Fix sees the legend of new-wave fantasy fiction return to rock ‘n’ roll, a genre he’s previously explored with uniquely heavy acts such as Hawkwind and Blüe Öyster Cult.

Don’t you want to listen to Christopher Lee narrating a documentary on tarot? (Open Culture)

Meet the real-life adventuress who turned Nancy Drew into a modern heroine (Zocalo Public Square)

Mary Post, Revolutionary-era spy, and the legend of the cursed hanging tree. (Seeks Ghosts)

Hey, here’s a link to Stephen Oliver’s original 1981 soundtrack to the BBC’s 13-part adaptation of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings.

Check out this giant list of free mythology ebooks (Project Gutenberg)

Yep, there’s such a thing as a professional dungeon master (as in, Dungeons & Dragons, natch) (Bloomberg Businessweek)

The Beast of Gevaudan, a bloodthirsty creature from 18th-century French legend, is said to have devoured almost 300 people. (Public Domain Review)

Engraving of the beast of Gevaudan, ca. 1765 (Public Domain Review)

Happy Hallowe’en!

Joshua Wilson

News and info from the Fabulist staff.

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