Consciousness

Luke says it’s not complicated, it’s a road trip: there’s a guy who drives (this is Luke). While he’s at the wheel, he thinks of things (fart jokes, designs for spill-proof mugs, prime numbers, film trivia, etc.). Sometimes he thinks aloud, sometimes he eats cheeseburgers. He’s not really sure where he’s going, but that’s not his problem. Because there’s a guy in the back seat (also Luke, but not our Luke; Luke 2.0) who tells the guy in front where to turn and reminds him about red lights and other technicalities. Sometimes they argue about shortcuts and pangs of regret. Otherwise the guy in back naps; this explains procrastination, Luke thinks. Then there’s another guy in the third row (Luke 3.0). He wears a suit and sunglasses and an earpiece (Luke likes spy movies) and he’s the one who decides where they’ll go, what city, ultimately. This third guy doesn’t say much, just gives commands over the car’s sound system. He’s scary enough that Luke-prime doesn’t like to look back at him. Even when he’s quiet, he’s always watching. He’s been known to override the guy in the backseat during debates about What To Do Next. He’s always right. Luke suspects a fourth row exists back there and a fourth guy who never speaks. Or maybe he’s spoken once, but Luke can’t remember what he said. Luke doesn’t like to contemplate Number Four. He prefers to look at the road. But possibly the rows are infinite back there. No passengers though, Luke says. Just the guys and an empty Styrofoam cup rolling around the floor.

Ceridwen Hall

Ceridwen Hall is pursuing a PhD in creative writing at the University of Utah and trying to teach herself Morse code. Her work appears or is forthcoming in SLANT, Grist, The Pinch, Salamander, Tar River Poetry, and other journals.
Ceridwen Hall

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Ceridwen Hall

Ceridwen Hall is pursuing a PhD in creative writing at the University of Utah and trying to teach herself Morse code. Her work appears or is forthcoming in SLANT, Grist, The Pinch, Salamander, Tar River Poetry, and other journals.

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